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Romanticism

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❶As that ideal swept through Europe , it became natural to believe that the age of tyrants might soon end. After a long silence, he returned to poetry with The Parish Register , The Borough , Tales in Verse , and Tales of the Hall , which gained him great popularity in the early 19th century.

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How did Shelley's career at Oxford University end?
Percy Bysshe Shelley
Literary Periods

Nevertheless, when he published his preface to Lyrical Ballads in , the time was ripe for a change: Useful as it is to trace the common elements in Romantic poetry, there was little conformity among the poets themselves. It is misleading to read the poetry of the first Romantics as if it had been written primarily to express their feelings. Their concern was rather to change the intellectual climate of the age.

William Blake had been dissatisfied since boyhood with the current state of poetry and what he considered the irreligious drabness of contemporary thought. His early development of a protective shield of mocking humour with which to face a world in which science had become trifling and art inconsequential is visible in the satirical An Island in the Moon written c. His desire for renewal encouraged him to view the outbreak of the French Revolution as a momentous event.

In works such as The Marriage of Heaven and Hell —93 and Songs of Experience , he attacked the hypocrisies of the age and the impersonal cruelties resulting from the dominance of analytic reason in contemporary thought. Blake developed these ideas in the visionary narratives of Milton —08 and Jerusalem — Here, still using his own mythological characters, he portrayed the imaginative artist as the hero of society and suggested the possibility of redemption from the fallen or Urizenic condition.

William Wordsworth and Samuel Taylor Coleridge , meanwhile, were also exploring the implications of the French Revolution. Wordsworth, who lived in France in —92 and fathered an illegitimate child there, was distressed when, soon after his return, Britain declared war on the republic, dividing his allegiance.

For the rest of his career, he was to brood on those events, trying to develop a view of humanity that would be faithful to his twin sense of the pathos of individual human fates and the unrealized potentialities in humanity as a whole. His investigation of the relationship between nature and the human mind continued in the long autobiographical poem addressed to Coleridge and later titled The Prelude —99 in two books; in five books; in 13 books; revised continuously and published posthumously, The Prelude constitutes the most significant English expression of the Romantic discovery of the self as a topic for art and literature.

Intimations of Immortality from Recollections of Early Childhood. Simultaneously, his poetic output became sporadic. The work of both poets was directed back to national affairs during these years by the rise of Napoleon.

In Wordsworth dedicated a number of sonnets to the patriotic cause. The death in of his brother John, who was a captain in the merchant navy , was a grim reminder that, while he had been living in retirement as a poet, others had been willing to sacrifice themselves.

From this time the theme of duty was to be prominent in his poetry. Both Wordsworth and Coleridge benefited from the advent in of the Regency, which brought a renewed interest in the arts. A Vision; The Pains of Sleep was published in Biographia Literaria , an account of his own development, combined philosophy and literary criticism in a new way and made an enduring and important contribution to literary theory.

His later religious writings made a considerable impact on Victorian readers. Sir Walter Scott , by contrast, was thought of as a major poet for his vigorous and evocative verse narratives The Lay of the Last Minstrel and Marmion Other verse writers were also highly esteemed. Another admired poet of the day was Thomas Moore , whose Irish Melodies began to appear in His highly coloured narrative Lalla Rookh: An Oriental Romance and his satirical poetry were also immensely popular.

Charlotte Smith was not the only significant woman poet in this period. The movement appealed to the revolutionary spirit of America as well as to those longing to break free of the strict religious traditions of early settlement.

The Romantics rejected rationalism and religious intellect. It appealed to those in opposition of Calvinism, which includes the belief that the destiny of each individual is preordained. The Romantic movement gave rise to New England Transcendentalism , which portrayed a less restrictive relationship between God and Universe. The new philosophy presented the individual with a more personal relationship with God.

Transcendentalism and Romanticism appealed to Americans in a similar fashion, for both privileged feeling over reason, individual freedom of expression over the restraints of tradition and custom. It often involved a rapturous response to nature. It encouraged the rejection of harsh, rigid Calvinism, and promised a new blossoming of American culture. American Romanticism embraced the individual and rebelled against the confinement of neoclassicism and religious tradition.

The Romantic movement in America created a new literary genre that continues to influence American writers. Novels, short stories, and poems replaced the sermons and manifestos of yore. Romantic literature was personal, intense, and portrayed more emotion than ever seen in neoclassical literature.

America's preoccupation with freedom became a great source of motivation for Romantic writers as many were delighted in free expression and emotion without so much fear of ridicule and controversy. They also put more effort into the psychological development of their characters, and the main characters typically displayed extremes of sensitivity and excitement.

The works of the Romantic Era also differed from preceding works in that they spoke to a wider audience, partly reflecting the greater distribution of books as costs came down during the period.

In the visual arts, Romanticism first showed itself in landscape painting , where from as early as the s British artists began to turn to wilder landscapes and storms, and Gothic architecture , even if they had to make do with Wales as a setting. Caspar David Friedrich and J. Turner were born less than a year apart in and respectively and were to take German and English landscape painting to their extremes of Romanticism, but both their artistic sensibilities were formed when forms of Romanticism was already strongly present in art.

John Constable , born in , stayed closer to the English landscape tradition, but in his largest "six-footers" insisted on the heroic status of a patch of the working countryside where he had grown up—challenging the traditional hierarchy of genres , which relegated landscape painting to a low status. Turner also painted very large landscapes, and above all, seascapes. Some of these large paintings had contemporary settings and staffage , but others had small figures that turned the work into history painting in the manner of Claude Lorrain , like Salvator Rosa a late Baroque artist whose landscapes had elements that Romantic painters repeatedly turned to.

Friedrich often used single figures, or features like crosses, set alone amidst a huge landscape, "making them images of the transitoriness of human life and the premonition of death. Other groups of artists expressed feelings that verged on the mystical, many largely abandoning classical drawing and proportions. Like Friedrich, none of these artists had significant influence after their deaths for the rest of the 19th century, and were 20th century rediscoveries from obscurity, though Blake was always known as a poet, and Norway's leading painter Johan Christian Dahl was heavily influenced by Friedrich.

The Rome-based Nazarene movement of German artists, active from , took a very different path, concentrating on medievalizing history paintings with religious and nationalist themes.

Girodet's old teacher David was puzzled and disappointed by his pupil's direction, saying: The second was a scene from the Greek War of Independence, completed the year Byron died there, and the last was a scene from one of Byron's plays. With Shakespeare, Byron was to provide the subject matter for many other works of Delacroix, who also spent long periods in North Africa, painting colourful scenes of mounted Arab warriors. His Liberty Leading the People remains, with the Medusa , one of the best-known works of French Romantic painting.

Both reflected current events, and increasingly " history painting ", literally "story painting", a phrase dating back to the Italian Renaissance meaning the painting of subjects with groups of figures, long considered the highest and most difficult form of art, did indeed become the painting of historical scenes, rather than those from religion or mythology.

Francisco Goya was called "the last great painter in whose art thought and observation were balanced and combined to form a faultless unity". In Spain, there was still a struggle to introduce the values of the Enlightenment , in which Goya saw himself as a participant. The demonic and anti-rational monsters thrown up by his imagination are only superficially similar to those of the Gothic fantasies of northern Europe, and in many ways he remained wedded to the classicism and realism of his training, as well as looking forward to the Realism of the later 19th century.

Sculpture remained largely impervious to Romanticism, probably partly for technical reasons, as the most prestigious material of the day, marble, does not lend itself to expansive gestures. The leading sculptors in Europe, Antonio Canova and Bertel Thorvaldsen , were both based in Rome and firm Neoclassicists, not at all tempted to allow influence from medieval sculpture, which would have been one possible approach to Romantic sculpture.

Francisco Goya , The Third of May , In France, historical painting on idealized medieval and Renaissance themes is known as the style Troubadour , a term with no equivalent for other countries, though the same trends occurred there. Their pictures are often small, and feature intimate private and anecdotal moments, as well as those of high drama. The lives of great artists such as Raphael were commemorated on equal terms with those of rulers, and fictional characters were also depicted.

Fleury-Richard's Valentine of Milan weeping for the death of her husband , shown in the Paris Salon of , marked the arrival of the style, which lasted until the mid-century, before being subsumed into the increasingly academic history painting of artists like Paul Delaroche. Another trend was for very large apocalyptic history paintings, often combining extreme natural events, or divine wrath, with human disaster, attempting to outdo The Raft of the Medusa , and now often drawing comparisons with effects from Hollywood.

The leading English artist in the style was John Martin , whose tiny figures were dwarfed by enormous earthquakes and storms, and worked his way through the biblical disasters, and those to come in the final days. Other works such as Delacroix's Death of Sardanapalus included larger figures, and these often drew heavily on earlier artists, especially Poussin and Rubens , with extra emotionalism and special effects.

Elsewhere in Europe, leading artists adopted Romantic styles: His long, prolific and extremely successful career saw him begin as a Neoclassical painter, pass right through the Romantic period, and emerge at the other end as a sentimental painter of young women. His Romantic period included many historical pieces of "Troubadour" tendencies, but on a very large scale, that are heavily influenced by Gian Battista Tiepolo and other late Baroque Italian masters.

Literary Romanticism had its counterpart in the American visual arts, most especially in the exaltation of an untamed American landscape found in the paintings of the Hudson River School.

They sometimes depicted ancient ruins of the old world, such as in Fredric Edwin Church's piece Sunrise in Syria.

These works reflected the Gothic feelings of death and decay. They also show the Romantic ideal that Nature is powerful and will eventually overcome the transient creations of men. More often, they worked to distinguish themselves from their European counterparts by depicting uniquely American scenes and landscapes. This idea of an American identity in the art world is reflected in W.

Bryant 's poem, To Cole, the Painter, Departing for Europe , where Bryant encourages Cole to remember the powerful scenes that can only be found in America. Some American paintings such as Albert Bierstadt's The Rocky Mountains, Lander's Peak promote the literary idea of the " noble savage " by portraying idealized Native Americans living in harmony with the natural world.

Thomas Cole's paintings tend towards allegory , explicit in The Voyage of Life series painted in the early s, showing the stages of life set amidst an awesome and immense nature.

William Blake , Albion Rose , Louis Janmot , from his series "The Poem of the Soul", before Musical Romanticism is predominantly a German phenomenon—so much so that one respected French reference work defines it entirely in terms of "The role of music in the aesthetics of German romanticism". Nevertheless, the huge popularity of German Romantic music led, "whether by imitation or by reaction", to an often nationalistically inspired vogue amongst Polish, Hungarian, Russian, Czech, and Scandinavian musicians, successful "perhaps more because of its extra-musical traits than for the actual value of musical works by its masters".

Although the term "Romanticism" when applied to music has come to imply the period roughly from until , or else until around , the contemporary application of "romantic" to music did not coincide with this modern interpretation.

Hoffmann named Mozart , Haydn and Beethoven as "the three masters of instrumental compositions" who "breathe one and the same romantic spirit".

He justified his view on the basis of these composers' depth of evocative expression and their marked individuality. In Haydn's music, according to Hoffmann, "a child-like, serene disposition prevails", while Mozart in the late E-flat major Symphony , for example "leads us into the depths of the spiritual world", with elements of fear, love, and sorrow, "a presentiment of the infinite Beethoven's music, on the other hand, conveys a sense of "the monstrous and immeasurable", with the pain of an endless longing that "will burst our breasts in a fully coherent concord of all the passions.

Because music was considered to be free of the constraints of reason, imagery, or any other precise concept, it came to be regarded, first in the writings of Wackenroder and Tieck and later by writers such as Schelling and Wagner , as preeminent among the arts, the one best able to express the secrets of the universe, to evoke the spirit world, infinity, and the absolute. This chronologic agreement of musical and literary Romanticism continued as far as the middle of the 19th century, when Richard Wagner denigrated the music of Meyerbeer and Berlioz as " neoromantic ": It was only toward the end of the 19th century that the newly emergent discipline of Musikwissenschaft musicology —itself a product of the historicizing proclivity of the age—attempted a more scientific periodization of music history, and a distinction between Viennese Classical and Romantic periods was proposed.

From Adler's viewpoint, found in books like Der Stil in der Musik , composers of the New German School and various lateth-century nationalist composers were not Romantics but "moderns" or "realists" by analogy with the fields of painting and literature , and this schema remained prevalent through the first decades of the 20th century.

By the second quarter of the 20th century, an awareness that radical changes in musical syntax had occurred during the early s caused another shift in historical viewpoint, and the change of century came to be seen as marking a decisive break with the musical past. This in turn led historians such as Alfred Einstein [] to extend the musical " Romantic Era " throughout the 19th century and into the first decade of the 20th. It has continued to be referred to as such in some of the standard music references such as The Oxford Companion to Music [] and Grout's History of Western Music [] but was not unchallenged.

For example, the prominent German musicologist Friedrich Blume , the chief editor of the first edition of Die Musik in Geschichte und Gegenwart —86 , accepted the earlier position that Classicism and Romanticism together constitute a single period beginning in the middle of the 18th century, but at the same time held that it continued into the 20th century, including such pre—World War II developments as expressionism and neoclassicism. Giovanni Boldini , Portrait of Giuseppe Verdi , In the contemporary music culture, the romantic musician followed a public career depending on sensitive middle-class audiences rather than on a courtly patron, as had been the case with earlier musicians and composers.

Public persona characterized a new generation of virtuosi who made their way as soloists, epitomized in the concert tours of Paganini and Liszt , and the conductor began to emerge as an important figure, on whose skill the interpretation of the increasingly complex music depended.

The Romantic movement affected most aspects of intellectual life, and Romanticism and science had a powerful connection, especially in the period — Many scientists were influenced by versions of the Naturphilosophie of Johann Gottlieb Fichte , Friedrich Wilhelm Joseph von Schelling and Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel and others, and without abandoning empiricism , sought in their work to uncover what they tended to believe was a unified and organic Nature.

The English scientist Sir Humphry Davy , a prominent Romantic thinker, said that understanding nature required "an attitude of admiration, love and worship, [ Self-understanding was an important aspect of Romanticism.

It had less to do with proving that man was capable of understanding nature through his budding intellect and therefore controlling it, and more to do with the emotional appeal of connecting himself with nature and understanding it through a harmonious co-existence.

History writing was very strongly, and many would say harmfully, influenced by Romanticism. Romantic nationalism had a largely negative effect on the writing of history in the 19th century, as each nation tended to produce its own version of history , and the critical attitude, even cynicism, of earlier historians was often replaced by a tendency to create romantic stories with clearly distinguished heroes and villains.

Much historical effort in the 20th century was devoted to combating the romantic historical myths created in the 19th century. To insulate theology from reductionism in science, 19th-century post-Enlightenment German theologians moved in a new direction, led by Friedrich Schleiermacher and Albrecht Ritschl.

They took the Romantic approach of rooting religion in the inner world of the human spirit, so that it is a person's feeling or sensibility about spiritual matters that comprises religion. Romantic chess was the style of chess which emphasized quick, tactical maneuvers rather than long-term strategic planning.

The " Immortal Game ", played by Adolf Anderssen and Lionel Kieseritzky on 21 June in London — where Anderssen made bold sacrifices to secure victory, giving up both rooks and a bishop, then his queen , and then checkmating his opponent with his three remaining minor pieces — is considered a supreme example of Romantic chess.

One of Romanticism's key ideas and most enduring legacies is the assertion of nationalism, which became a central theme of Romantic art and political philosophy.

From the earliest parts of the movement, with their focus on development of national languages and folklore , and the importance of local customs and traditions, to the movements that would redraw the map of Europe and lead to calls for self-determination of nationalities, nationalism was one of the key vehicles of Romanticism, its role, expression and meaning. One of the most important functions of medieval references in the 19th century was nationalist.

Popular and epic poetry were its workhorses. This is visible in Germany and Ireland, where underlying Germanic or Celtic linguistic substrates dating from before the Romanization-Latinization were sought out. And, in Catalonia, nationalists reclaimed Catalanism from before the Hispanicization of the Catholic Monarchs in the 15th century, when the Crown of Aragon was unified with the Castilian nobility.

Early Romantic nationalism was strongly inspired by Rousseau , and by the ideas of Johann Gottfried von Herder , who in argued that the geography formed the natural economy of a people, and shaped their customs and society.

The nature of nationalism changed dramatically, however, after the French Revolution with the rise of Napoleon , and the reactions in other nations. Napoleonic nationalism and republicanism were, at first, inspirational to movements in other nations: But as the French Republic became Napoleon's Empire , Napoleon became not the inspiration for nationalism, but the object of its struggle. In Prussia , the development of spiritual renewal as a means to engage in the struggle against Napoleon was argued by, among others, Johann Gottlieb Fichte , a disciple of Kant.

The word Volkstum , or nationality, was coined in German as part of this resistance to the now conquering emperor. Fichte expressed the unity of language and nation in his address "To the German Nation" in Those who speak the same language are joined to each other by a multitude of invisible bonds by nature herself, long before any human art begins; they understand each other and have the power of continuing to make themselves understood more and more clearly; they belong together and are by nature one and an inseparable whole.

Only when each people, left to itself, develops and forms itself in accordance with its own peculiar quality, and only when in every people each individual develops himself in accordance with that common quality, as well as in accordance with his own peculiar quality—then, and then only, does the manifestation of divinity appear in its true mirror as it ought to be.

This view of nationalism inspired the collection of folklore by such people as the Brothers Grimm , the revival of old epics as national, and the construction of new epics as if they were old, as in the Kalevala , compiled from Finnish tales and folklore, or Ossian , where the claimed ancient roots were invented.

The view that fairy tales, unless contaminated from outside literary sources, were preserved in the same form over thousands of years, was not exclusive to Romantic Nationalists, but fit in well with their views that such tales expressed the primordial nature of a people.

For instance, the Brothers Grimm rejected many tales they collected because of their similarity to tales by Charles Perrault , which they thought proved they were not truly German tales; [] Sleeping Beauty survived in their collection because the tale of Brynhildr convinced them that the figure of the sleeping princess was authentically German. He regarded the oral literature of the peasants as an integral part of Serbian culture, compiling it to use in his collections of folk songs, tales, and proverbs, as well as the first dictionary of vernacular Serbian.

Romanticism played an essential role in the national awakening of many Central European peoples lacking their own national states, not least in Poland, which had recently failed to restore its independence when Russia's army crushed the Polish Uprising under Nicholas I.

Revival and reinterpretation of ancient myths, customs and traditions by Romantic poets and painters helped to distinguish their indigenous cultures from those of the dominant nations and crystallise the mythography of Romantic nationalism. Patriotism, nationalism, revolution and armed struggle for independence also became popular themes in the arts of this period.

Arguably, the most distinguished Romantic poet of this part of Europe was Adam Mickiewicz , who developed an idea that Poland was the Messiah of Nations , predestined to suffer just as Jesus had suffered to save all the people. The Polish self-image as a " Christ among nations " or the martyr of Europe can be traced back to its history of Christendom and suffering under invasions.

During the periods of foreign occupation, the Catholic Church served as bastion of Poland's national identity and language, and the major promoter of Polish culture. The partitions came to be seen in Poland as a Polish sacrifice for the security for Western civilization. Adam Mickiewicz wrote the patriotic drama Dziady directed against the Russians where he depicts Poland as the Christ of Nations. He also wrote "Verily I say unto you, it is not for you to learn civilization from foreigners, but it is you who are to teach them civilization You are among the foreigners like the Apostles among the idolaters".

In " Books of the Polish nation and Polish pilgrimage " Mickiewicz detailed his vision of Poland as a Messias and a Christ of Nations, that would save mankind. Dziady is known for various interpretation. The most known ones are the moral aspect of part II, individualist and romantic message of part IV, as well as deeply patriotic, messianistic and Christian vision in part III of poem.

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Examples of romanticism in a Sentence Try not to discourage the romanticism of college students. Recent Examples of romanticism from the Web Because no fan base has a shorter memory, or a stronger penchant for romanticism , than the NBA's. Perhaps, but there was also a romanticism and dreaminess to the clothes, not to mention pretty terrific double-C puffers.

From Jacquemus, Loewe, and Ann Demeulemeester comes an aesthetic revival for the purity, craft, and romanticism of the countryside. Once Hamilton stepped forward, listeners could revel in the dusky quality of his sound and the heightened romanticism of his delivery.

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The Romantic period The nature of Romanticism As a term to cover the most distinctive writers who flourished in the last years of the 18th century and the first decades of the 19th, “Romantic” is indispensable but also a little misleading: there was no self-styled “Romantic movement” at the time, and the great writers of the period did not call themselves Romantics.

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On top of this, there was a clearly mystical quality to Romantic writing that sets it apart from other literary periods. Of course, not every Romantic poet or novelist displayed all, or .

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The romantic period is a term applied to the literature of approximately the first third of the nineteenth century. During this time, literature began to move in channels that were not entirely new but were in strong contrast to the standard literary practice of the eighteenth century. Romanticism, attitude or intellectual orientation that characterized many works of literature, painting, music, architecture, criticism, and historiography in Western civilization over a period from the late 18th to the midth century.

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[There is a great deal of debate among literary critics to sum up what the characteristics of Romantic writing are. Some sources say there are ten; others report five or seven. Several characteristics are the supernatural, return to nature, idealization of women and children, personification, individuality, and an interest in the past (especially medieval), among others. While study of the Romantic Period for many years focused on “the big six”— Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Shelley, and Keats—scholars have more recently expanded their focus to include many diverse authors and genres of writing from the period.