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Essay/Term paper: Shakespeare's life

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❶In Sonnet , for example, the argument is that a love that alters with time and circumstance is not a true, but a self-regarding love.

William Shakespeare's Poetry

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Shakespeare apparently arrived in London around and by had gained success as an actor and a playwright. Shortly after that, he secured the business of Henry Wriothesley, 3rd earl of Southampton. The publication of Shakespeare's two poems Venus and Adonis and The Rape of Lucrece and some of his Sonnets published , established a reputation for him as a talented and popular Renaissance poet.

The Sonnets describe the devotion of a character to a young man whose beauty and charm he praises and to a mysterious and untrue woman with whom the poet is afraid. The following triangular situation, resulting from the attraction of the poet's friend to the woman, is treated with passionate intensity and psychological insight.

However, Shakespeare's modern reputation is based mainly on the 38 plays that he wrote, modified, and collaborated on. When in his days, these plays frequently had little respect by his educated friends, who considered English plays of their own to be only tasteless entertainment.

Shakespeare's professional life in London was marked by a number of financially beneficial arrangements that allowed him to share in the profits of his acting company, the Chamberlain's Men, later called the King's Men.

The acting company had two theaters, the Globe Theatre and the Blackfriars. His plays were given special presentation at the courts of Queen Elizabeth I and King James I more frequently than those of any other coexistent writer. It was known that he risked losing royal favor only once, in , when his company performed "the play of the deposing and killing of King Richard II" at the request of a group of conspirators against Elizabeth.

They were led by Elizabeth's unsuccessful court favorite, Robert Devereux, 2nd Earl of Essex, and by the earl of Southampton. In the later study, Shakespeare's company was cleared of dealing with the conspiracy.

After , Shakespeare's dramatic production lessened and it seemed that he spent more time in Stratford. There he had secure family in a wealthy house called New Place. Shakespeare had become a leading local citizen. He died on April 23, , and was buried in the Stratford church. The following guidelines are designed to give students a checklist to use, whether they are revising individually or as part of a peer review team.

Introduction Is the main idea i. Is the introductory paragraph interesting? Does it make the reader want to keep on reading? To attempt criticism of the sonnets is, to an unusual extent, to be challenged to make oneself vulnerable, to undergo a kind of creative therapy, as one goes back and forth from such textual gaps and indeterminacies to the shifting, vulnerable self, making the reader aware of the inadequacy and betrayal of words, as well as of their amazing seductiveness.

Consider, for example, Sonnet When one falls in love with a much younger person, does one inevitably feel the insecurity of a generation gap? What is more important in such a reading of the sonnets is the insistence that age or youthfulness are not important in themselves: It is the insistence itself that is important, not the mere fact of age—just as it is the anxiety with which a man or woman watches the wrinkles beneath the eyes that is important, not the wrinkles themselves.

It stands for an invitation to participate in some wider psychological revelation, to confess the vulnerability that people encounter in themselves in any relationship that is real and growing, and therefore necessarily unpredictable and risky. Without vulnerability and contingency, without the sense of being thrown into the world, there can be no growth.

Hence the poet invites the reader to accept ruefully what the fact of his age evokes—an openness to ridicule or rejection. This is especially so in the Dark Lady sonnets, where there is a savage laceration of self, particularly in the fearful exhaustion of Sonnet , in which vulnerability is evoked as paralysis. At once logically relentless and emotionally centrifugal, Sonnet generates fears or vulnerability and self-disgust. The strategies of the poem work to make the reader reveal or recognize his or her own compulsions and revulsions.

Even in the seemingly most serene sonnets, there are inevitably dark shadows of insecurity and anxiety. In Sonnet , for example, the argument is that a love that alters with time and circumstance is not a true, but a self-regarding love. The poem purports to define true love by negatives, but if those negatives are deliberately negated, the poem that emerges may be seen as the dark, repressed underside of the apparently unassailable affirmation of a mature, self-giving, other-directed love.

Such apparent affirmations may be acts of repression, an attempt to regiment the unrelenting unexpectedness and challenge of love. There are poems in the collection that, although less assertive, show a willingness to be vulnerable, to reevaluate constantly, to swear permanence within, not despite, transience—to be, in the words of Saint Paul, deceivers yet true. Elsewhere, part of the torture of the Dark Lady sonnets is that such a consolation does not emerge through the pain.

In short, what Sonnet represses is the acknowledgment that the only fulfillment worth having is one that is struggled for and that is independent of law or compulsion. The kind of creative fragility that it tries to marginalize is that evoked in the conclusion to Sonnet 49 when the poet admits his vulnerability: Lovers can affirm the authenticity of the erotic only by admitting the possibility that it is not absolute.

Love has no absolute legal, moral, or causal claims; nor, in the final analysis, can love acknowledge the bonds of law, family, or state—or if finally they are acknowledged, it is because they grow from love itself.

Love moves by its own internal dynamic; it is not motivated by a series of external compulsions. Ultimately it asks from the lover the nolo contendere of commitment: Do with me what you will. A real, that is to say, an altering, bending, never fixed and unpredictable love is always surrounded by, and at times seems to live by, battles, plots, subterfuges, quarrels, and irony. At the root is the acknowledgment that any affirmation is made because of, not despite, time and human mortality. Just how can one affirm in the face of that degree of reality?

Under the pressure of such questioning, the affirmation of Sonnet can therefore be seen as a kind of bad faith, a false dread—false, because it freezes lovers in inactivity when they should, on the contrary, accept their finitude as possibility. Paradoxically, it is precisely because they are indeed among the wastes of time that they are beautiful; they are not desirable because they are immortal but because they are irrevocably time-bound.

One of the most profound truths is expressed in Sonnet At their most courageous, humans do not merely affirm, despite the forces of change and unpredictability that provide the ever-shifting centers of their lives; on the contrary, they discover their greatest strengths because of and within their own contingency.

Against a sonnet such as , some sonnets depict love not as a serene continuation of life but rather as a radical reorientation. Readers are asked not to dismiss, but to affirm fears of limitation.

The typical Renaissance attitude to time and mutability was one of fear or resignation unless, as in Spenser, the traditional Christian context could be evoked as compensation; but for Shakespeare the enormous energies released by the Renaissance are wasted in trying to escape the burden of temporality. The drive to stasis, to repress experiences and meanings, is a desire to escape the burden of realizing that there are some transformations which love cannot effect.

They are offered not in certainty, but in hope. They invite affirmation while insisting that pain is the dark visceral element in which humans must live and struggle. Many of the Dark Lady sonnets are grim precisely because the lover can see no way to break through such pain. What they lack, fundamentally, is hope.

There is a sense in which men are all fools of time. The twelve-line Sonnet is conventionally regarded as the culmination of the first part of the sequence. Its serenity is very unlike that of Venus and Adonis In his first venture into public poetry, Shakespeare chose to work within the generic constraints of the fashionable Ovidian verse romance.

The Phoenix and the Turtle The Phoenix and the Turtle is an allegorical, highly technical celebration of an ideal love union:

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Essay on The Unaccounted for Period of William Shakespeare's Life - The Unaccounted for Period of William Shakespeare's Life William Shakespeare was born on April 26th [1] in Stratford on-Avon to parents John and Mary.

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Biography of William Shakespeare Essay Words | 4 Pages William Shakespeare was born on April 23rd in Stratford-upon-Avon and died on April 23rd ; he was 52 years old when he died and was buried in the Stratford church.

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Essay William Shakespeare was born on April 23, He was baptized on April 24, , in Stratford-upon-Avon, Warwickshire. He was the third of eight children born to John Shakespeare and Mary Arden. John was a well-known merchant and Mary was the daughter of a Roman Catholic member of the gentry. Shakespeare was educated at the local grammar school. Shakespeare was a leading member of the group from for the rest of his career. had produced at least six of Shakespeare’s plays; During Shakespeare’s life, .

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Essay on William Shakespeare Biography - "All the world's a stage and all the men and women merely players." (paydayloanslexington.gq) This quote, written by William Shakespeare, illustrates that everybody is a little part of the big world, merely playing his or her "role" as a human. William Shakespeare is arguably the most famous writer of the English language, known for both his plays and sonnets. Though much about his life remains open to debate due to incomplete evidence, the following biography consolidates the most widely-accepted facts of Shakespeare's life and career.